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Glossary Results

S - 261 matching terms

SAAMI
The acronym for the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute.

SABOT
A carrier in which a sub-caliber projectile is centered to permit firing the projectile in a larger bore firearm.

SADDLE RING
A ring usually attached to the receiver of a firearm designed to be carried by a horseback rider.

SAFE
An incorrect generic term for Safety.

SAFETY (HANDLING)
Precautions taken by firearms users to help provide protection against accidental or unintentional discharge.

SAFETY (MECHANISM)
1. A device on a firearm intended to help provide protection against accidental or unintentional discharge under normal usage when properly engaged.
2. On - A term describing the position of a component of the safety device when set in a manner to provide protection against accidental or unintentional discharge under normal usage.
3. Off - To allow the firearm to be discharged.

SAFETY, AUTOMATIC
A safety device on some firearms intended to return to the On position when the action is opened.

SAFETY, CROSS BOLT
A type of manual firearm safety operated by a lateral force on a button usually located in the trigger guard. Also called Push-Button Safety.

SAFETY, GRIP
An auxiliary device on the grip of some handguns which is intended to prevent firing until depressed.

SAFETY, HALF COCK
See Half Cock.

SAFETY, MANUAL
A safety device on some firearms that must be manually engaged and subsequently disengaged to permit normal firing.

SAFETY, PUSH BUTTON
See Safety, Cross Bolt.

SAFETY, SLIDING
A manual safety mechanism on a firearm that is operated by a longitudinal sliding motion.

SAFETY, TANG
A type of safety in which the external control component is mounted on the upper receiver tang of a firearm.

SAFETY, THUMB
A type of manual safety in which the external control component is located for convenient operation by the thumb of the trigger hand.

SAFETY, WING
A manual safety found on some bolt action rifles, usually mounted at the rear of the bolt assembly, which pivots in an arc at right angles to the bore line.

SCATTERLOAD
See Brush Load.

SCHNABEL
A German term for a hook shaped knob at the forearm tip of a stock.

SCHUETZEN BUTTPLATE
An extremely concave metal butt plate with a rearward extension usually at the bottom used mostly on target rifles for offhand (standing) shooting.

SCREW, STRAIN
A screw which bears against a leaf spring and by its movement in or out will change the tension of the spring.

SCREW, TANG
The screw or screws passing through either one or both tangs by which the stock or trigger guard is attached to the receiver or frame.

SCREWS, STOCKMAKERS HAND
Extra long screws used by stockmakers during the inletting operation to maintain alignment of the trigger guard and other auxiliary items with the action. Also known as Inletting Screws or Guide Screws.

SEAR
A part which retains the hammer or striker in the cocked position. When released, it permits firing.

SEASON CRACKING
A term used for stress-corrosion cracking that involves metallic cases or shotshell cups with both residual stress and specific corrosive agents.

SEATING
The positioning of a primer or bullet in a metallic cartridge case or a wad in a shotshell.

SEATING DEPTH
The longitudinal position of a bullet, primer or wad in a cartridge case.

SECANT OGIVE
See Ogive, Secant.

SECTIONAL DENSITY
The ratio of bullet weight to its diameter.

SELECTOR
1. In a double barreled gun, a device to allow the shooter to choose which barrel is to be fired by the first pull of the trigger.
2. A lever which enables the shooter to choose the type of fire, semi-auto or full auto, with high or low rate of automatic fire.

SELF-LOADER
See Action, Semiautomatic.

SEMI-INLETTED STOCK
See Stock, Semi-inletted.

SEMI-RIMMED CASE
See Cartridge, Semi-Rimmed.

SEMIAUTOMATIC
Firearm which fires, extracts, ejects and reloads once for each pull and release of the trigger. Also called Self-loading or Auto-loading.

SENSITIVITY TEST FOR PRIMED SHELLS OR PRIMERS
A method of determining the sensitivity of primed cases held in a specified die and subjected to a range of specified firing-pin blows imparted by a freely falling ball. Commonly called Drop Test.

SERIAL NUMBER
A number applied to a firearm by the manufacturer in order to identify the individual firearm.

SERRATION
Narrow parallel grooves cut into a surface to provide a gripping surface or to break up light reflections.

SERVICE AMMUNITION
See Ammunition, Service.

SERVICE LOADS
See Ammunition, Service.

SETTING
The arming of a set-trigger mechanism of a firearm so equipped. (See “Trigger, Set”.)

SHEATH TRIGGER
See Trigger, Sheath.

SHELL
A contraction for shotshell. See Shotshell.

SHELL CATCHER
A device for catching fired shells.

SHELL HOLDER
A device for holding the head of a cartridge case in a reloading tool.

SHELL LATCH
See Cut Off.

SHELL PAPER
Shotshells which are constructed with a body made from paper tubing.

SHELL, UNIBODY
See Shotshell, One Piece.

SHELL-STOP
See Cut Off (No. 1.)

SHOCK WAVE
The disturbance of air surrounding and behind the bullet caused by a compression of the air column directly in front of the bullet.

SHOCKING POWER
A colloquial term used to describe the ability of a projectile to dissipate its kinetic energy effectively in a target.

SHOE
1. A metallic adapter fastened to a trigger to widen the surface.
2. A metallic insert in the forearm of a side-by-side double barreled shotgun by which the forearm is attached to the barrels. Also called Fore-end Iron, Fore-end Plate.

SHOOT-OFF
The separation of the mouth end of a shotshell from the body when it is fired.

SHOOTING GLASSES
Eye protection and sight improvement specifically designed for, and which should always be used, when shooting firearms.

SHORT
A type of 22 caliber rimfire cartridge.

SHORT ROUND
A cartridge in which the bullet is seated below the specified minimum length.

SHOT
Spherical pellets used in loading shotshells. Commonly formed from lead but may be made from steel.

SHOT BRIDGING
A wedging action of shot pellets in a tube causing a stoppage of flow in a shotshell loading operation.

SHOT CARTRIDGE
See Cartridge, Shot.

SHOT COLUMN
The length of the shot load in a shotshell.

SHOT DIVERTER
A device attached to the muzzle of a shotgun to provide oval shot patterns.

SHOT STRING
The distance between the leading and trailing pellets of a shot charge in flight.

SHOT TOWER
A tall building in which molten lead alloy is dropped through a colander near the top of the tower into a tank of water at the bottom to produce spherical pellets.

SHOT, DROP
Lead shot containing less than 0.5% alloying metal. Also called Soft Shot.

SHOT, BALLED
The fusing together of several pellets in a shotshell load, usually caused by hot propellant gases leaking past the wadding and fusing the shot while the shot is still in the barrel. See Shot, Fused.

SHOT, BIRD
A general term used to indicate any shot smaller than buckshot.

SHOT, CHILLED
Lead Shot containing more than 0.5% alloying metal to increase its hardness. Also called Hard Shot.

SHOT, COATED
Copper or nickel-plated shot, coated to increase apparent shot hardness and reduce in-bore shot deformation.

SHOT, DUST
Lead shot having a nominal diameter of .040” or smaller.

SHOT, FUSED
Two or more shot pellets joined together during the process of manufacturing or during firing.

SHOT, HARD
See Shot, Chilled.

SHOT, LEAD
See Shot, Drop or Shot, Chilled.

SHOT, PLATED
See Shot, Coated.

SHOT, SIZE
A numerical or letter(s) designation indicating the average diameter of a pellet. With numerical designations, the average pellet diameter may be determined as follows: Shot Size = (17 – Number Designation)/100 For example, for No. 6 shot: (17-6)/100 = 0.11” 17 - Designation Number = Avg. Shot diameter in hundredths of an inch 100 EXAMPLE: For No. 10 Shot: 17-10 = 7/100 = .07”

SHOT, STEEL
Soft steel pellets made specifically for use in shotshells.

SHOT-COLLAR
A plastic or paper insert surrounding the shot charge in a shotshell to reduce distortion of the shot when passing through the barrel.

SHOTGUN
Smooth bore shoulder firearm designated to fire cartridges containing numerous pellets or a single slug.

SHOTGUN, DOUBLE
A shotgun with two barrels adjacent to each other in the horizontal plane. If arranged vertically, it is usually termed an “over and under” shotgun.

SHOTS, WARMING
Preliminary shots before firing for velocity, pressure, accuracy, etc.

SHOTSHELL
A round of ammunition containing multiple pellets for use in a shotgun.

SHOTSHELL, ONE PIECE
1. A shotshell component having the body and basewad as a single unit with a metallic cup. Sometimes called Unibody Shell.
2. A complete round of ammunition having the body and basewad as a single unit without a head of a different material.

SHOTSHELL, PLASTIC
A complete round of ammunition having a plastic body, a basewad that may or may not be a single unit and a metallic head.

SHOULDER
1. Act of placing a shotgun or rifle to a shooter’s shoulder, in order to properly align the sights and fire at a target.
2. The sloping portion of a metallic cartridge case that connects the neck and the body of a bottleneck-type cartridge.
3. The square or angular step between two diameters on a barrel, pin, stud or other part commonly used in sporting firearms.

SHOULDER SPLIT
See Split, Shoulder.

SHOULDER-ARM
Any firearm fitted with a stock and designed to be used while held with both hands and supported by a shoulder.

SIDE PIN OR SCREW
Screw used to attach side-locks to frame and/or stock.

SIDE-BY-SIDE
A firearm with two barrels arranged adjacently in the horizontal plane.

SIDE-HAMMER
A firearm with the hammer located externally on the side of the frame as contrasted to an internally pivoted hammer.

SIDE-LOCK
A form of firearm construction that has the firing mechanism mounted on detachable plates on the side.

SIDE-PLATE
A removable plate in the frame or receiver to allow access to internal parts or upon which some internal parts are mounted.

SIDEARM
A pistol or revolver.

SIGHT
Any of a variety of devices, mechanical or optical, designed to assist in aiming a firearm.

SIGHT ADJUSTMENT
The movement of a sight to change the point of impact.

SIGHT APERTURE
The hole in the disc of an Aperture Sight.

SIGHT BASE
That part of a sight that is usually attached to a gun.

SIGHT BEAD
The small cylindrical top portion on some forms of front sights.

SIGHT BLADE
Thin, flat metal post used as the front sight on some firearms.

SIGHT COVER
Protective metal cover fastened about a sight to guard it from being moved out of adjustment from jars or blows. Sometimes called a Sight Hood or Hooded Sight.

SIGHT DISC
That part of an aperture (peep) sight that contains the hole. May have either a fixed orifice or contain an iris diaphragm to vary its size.

SIGHT ELEVATION
The height to which a rear sight is set to zero-in the firearm for any specific range.

SIGHT EXTENSION
A device that increases the distance between the sights.

SIGHT HOOD, FRONT
A cover to protect the front sight from damage.

SIGHT INSERTS
Metal or plastic discs with either apertures or posts for use in globe front sights.

SIGHT LEAF
The vertical portion of a metallic rear sight containing the notch.

SIGHT PICTURE
The visual image observed by the shooter when the firearm sights are properly aligned on the point-of-aim.

SIGHT RADIUS
The distance between the rear sight and the front sight on a firearm.

SIGHT RAMP
A front sight which is mounted atop a ramp.

SIGHT, ADJUSTABLE
Usually taken to mean a rear sight that is adjustable for windage or elevation or both. However, adjustable front sights are sometimes used on target firearms.

SIGHT, APERTURE
A form of metallic sight, front or rear, containing and aperture or disc with a hole. See Sight Aperture. Also called Peep Sight, or Receiver Sight (if mounted on receiver).

SIGHT, BARLEYCORN
See Sight, Pyramid.

SIGHT, BUCKHORN
A rear sight for hunting rifles that has the V notch at the bottom of an almost completely closed “U.”

SIGHT, FOLDING
A rear sight that can be folded down.

SIGHT, FRONT
Any form of sighting device at or near the muzzle of a firearm.

SIGHT, GLOBE FRONT
A form of front sight usually used on target rifles generally cylindrical in shape and arranged to accept various inserts containing either rings or posts.

SIGHT, HOODED
A front sight that is provided with a cover to shade it from direct light.

SIGHT, IRON
See Sight, Metallic.

SIGHT, LINE OF
A straight line drawn from the shooter’s eye, passing through the sights of a firearm and extending from the firearm to a target.

SIGHT, METALLIC
Any sight, front or rear, not containing optical magnifying elements. It may be fixed or adjustable. Also called Iron Sight.

SIGHT, MICROMETER
A sight with a mechanism for adjusting windage and elevation settings controlled by cylindrically calibrated knobs, usually with detents to control and indicate setting intervals.

SIGHT, MIDDLE
A second, smaller bead sight near the middle of the barrel or barrels of some shotguns.

SIGHT, MULTIPLE LEAF
A type of open, rear sight having more than one folding leaves. It may also have one fixed leaf.

SIGHT, NOTCH
An Open rear sight having either a “V,” “U” or square shaped cut on its upper edge.

SIGHT, OPEN
A rear sight having a notch through which the front sight is aligned for aiming.

SIGHT, PAINE
A rear sight on pistols or revolvers having a flat top with a “U” shaped notch used with bead-topped front sight. Named after Ira Paine, 19th Century match and exhibition shooter.

SIGHT, PATRIDGE
A rear sight on pistols or revolvers having a flat top with a square notch used with a broad flat-topped front sight. Named after E. E. Patridge.

SIGHT, PEEP
Common, popular term for aperture rear sights.

SIGHT, POST
A front sight with flat sides and top.

SIGHT, PYRAMID
A type of front sight of triangular appearance. Also called Barleycorn Sight.

SIGHT, REAR
Any metallic sight used in conjunction with a metallic front sight located anywhere between the shooter eye and the front sight.

SIGHT, RECEIVER
Any rear sight fitted to the receiver of a firearm, but usually refers to an aperture or “peep” sight.

SIGHT, SCOPE
See Sight, Telescope (Telescopic).

SIGHT, TANG
Any sight mounted on the upper tang of a firearm.

SIGHT, TANGENT
A rear sight in which the blade is adjusted for elevation correction by sliding along a curved cam or cams.

SIGHT, TELESCOPE (TELESCOPIC)
A sight containing optical elements which magnify or enlarge the target.

SIGHT, TUBE
A metal tube that contains the rear sight.

SIGHT, VERNIER
A long-range sight with a mechanism for adjusting windage and/or elevation settings as read on a short scale in conjunction with graduations on a longer, linearly calibrated, scale.

SIGHTING-IN
The procedure of adjusting the sights so as to bring the point of impact to coincide with the point of aim.

SIGHTING-SHOT
Shot(s) fired to determine point of impact.

SIGHTS, TARGET
Sights designed for use in competitive shooting.

SILENCER
A device attached to the muzzle of a firearm to reduce the noise of discharge. Sometimes called a Suppressor. Heavily regulated under 1934 National Firearms Act.

SINGLE ACTION
See Action, Single.

SINGLE SHOT
See Action, Single Shot.

SINGLE TRIGGER
See Trigger, Single.

SIX O’CLOCK HOLD
A sight picture where the top of the sight is tangent to the bottom of the bullseye.

SIZING
1. The reduction in diameter of a bullet by forcing it through a die of smaller diameter than the bullet.
2. The reduction in diameter of a cartridge case by forcing it into a die of smaller diameter than the case.

SIZING DIE
A tool used to form a cartridge case or bullet to proper dimensions.

SIZING, FULL LENGTH
The operation of reforming a fired cartridge case to approximately its original dimensions.

SIZING, NECK
The operation performed by reloaders to reduce or restore the original neck diameter of a fired cartridge.

SKEET GUN
A shotgun with an open choke specifically designed for Skeet shooting or close range hunting.

SKEET SHOOTING
A shotgun target sport in which shooters move around a semi-circle and fire at clay targets thrown at specified angles and from a high and a low “house”, each containing a target trap.

SKELETON BUTT PLATE
A metal buttplate forming only a border for the butt.

SKID MARKS
Longitudinal rifling marks formed on the bearing surface of bullets as they enter the rifling of the barrel before rotation of the bullet starts.

SKIP-LINE CHECKERING
See French Checkering.

SLAVE ACTION
See Action, Slave.

SLAVE PIN
A pin used during assembly of a firearm to facilitate the process and later replaced by a permanent pin or screw.

SLEEVE
1. A means of renewing old shotgun barrels by insertion of a tube.
2. A tube surrounding the receiver of a target rifle to improve rigidity.
3. The shot contained in a shotshell.

SLIDE
A member attached to and reciprocating with the breech block.

SLIDE ACTION
See Action, Slide.

SLIDE STOP
Device to retain slide in an open position.

SLIDE, REBOUND
A reciprocating device found in some double action revolvers which moves the hammer into a position in which there is no contact of either hammer and firing-pin or firing-pin and primer. It can also be used to position a safety device between hammer and firing-pin or primer in such revolvers.

SLIDING SAFETY
See Safety, Sliding.

SLING
A strap detachably fastened to a firearm to assist in carrying or to steady it during firing.

SLING, SWIVEL
A metallic loop to which the sling is attached.

SLING, TARGET
See Target, Sling.

SLOT BLANK
A dovetail-shaped metal part to occupy an unused dovetail slot.

SLOTTED TIP
A cleaning rod tip with a slot to hold a cleaning patch.

SLUG
A term applied to a single projectile for shotgun shells. Also slang term for bullet.

SLUG, BRENNEKE
A formed rifled slug with a wad assembly attached to its base by a screw for use in shotguns.

SLUG, RIFLED
Single projectile with spiral grooves and hollow base, intended for use in shotguns.

SLUGGING (BORE)
A process of determining the interior dimensions of a rifled barrel by measuring a lead ball which has been expanded to fill the bore.

SMALL ARMS
Generally a military term. Fully automatic weapon capable of being carried by a person and fired without additional mechanical support.

SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION
See Ammunition, Small Arms.

SMALL-BORE
In America, any firearm or ammunition of the rimfire type with a lead alloy bullet not over 0.23” in diameter.

SMALL-OF-THE-STOCK
See Stock, Small Of The.

SMOOTH-BORE
Firearm with unrifled bore, typically a shotgun.

SNAP-CAP
A protective device to permit dry firing without damage to the firing-pin.

SOFT POINT PROJECTILE
See Bullet, Soft Point.

SOFT POINT, SIDE SPLIT PROJECTILE
See Projectile, Soft Point Side Split.

SOFT SHOT
See Shot, Drop.

SOLID FRAME
See Frame, Solid.

SOLID RIB
See Rib, Solid.

SPEED OF ROTATION (SPIN)
The rate of spin of a projectile fired from a rifled barrel.

SPENT PROJECTILE
See Projectile, Spent.

SPIRE POINT PROJECTILE
See Projectile, Spire Point.

SPITZER PROJECTILE
See Projectile, Spitzer

SPLIT BASE
See Base, Split.

SPLIT BRIDGE
See Receiver Bridge.

SPLIT CASE
See Case Split.

SPLIT NECK
See Neck, Split.

SPLIT RIM
See Rim, Split.

SPLIT, SHOULDER
A longitudinal rupture in side wall of the shoulder of a bottlenecked cartridge case.

SPOOL MAGAZINE
See Magazine, Rotary.

SPORTERIZE
The act or process of converting a military weapon to a sporting firearm, usually by removing unneeded accessories, and altering the barrel and/or stock.

SPORTING GUN
See Gun, Sporting.

SPREAD, EXTREME
The distance between the centers of the two shots which are the farthest apart of a group of shots on a target.

SPREADER LOAD
See Load, Brush.

SPRING, OPERATING
A spring used to close the action in automatic and autoloading firearms. Also called Counter Recoil Spring or Recoil Spring.

SPUR HAMMER
See Hammer, Spur.

SQUARE BUTT
Handle of a revolver with a flat or squared end.

SQUIB
See Load, Squib.

SQUIB LOAD
See Load, Squib.

STANDARD VELOCITY
See Velocity, Standard.

STANDING BREECH
See Breech, Standing.

STAR CRIMP
See Crimp, Star.

STAR GAGE
See Gage, Star.

STEADY-PIN
A projection at the end of a mainspring which fits into the lock plate of a side lock action gun.

STEM (STEMMING)
A failure of a cartridge to feed in which the bullet jams against the top or bottom of the chamber. Also called Cock-Up or Cock-Down.

STIPPLING
The roughing of wood or metal with a pointed tool. It is normally performed to provide a gripping or decorative surface. Also called Matting.

STIRRUP
A component with divided legs to apply force equally. Mainly used in a trigger assembly where it is necessary to straddle another component.

STOCK
The wood or plastic component to which the metal parts of a firearm are attached to enable the shooter to hold the firearm.

STOCK BOLT
A bolt which passes through a buttstock lengthwise to secure it to the receiver or frame.

STOCK DIMENSIONS
General stock dimensions consist of the following: length of pull, drop at comb, drop at Monte Carlo, drop at heel, pitch and cast.
A. Rifles
1. Cast is the lateral displacement of the centerline of the buttplate (pad) from the centerline of the bore. For a right-handed shooter, when the centerline of the buttplate is to the left of the bore, it is expressed as cast-on and to the right as cast-off. The opposite is true for left-handed shooters.
2. Drop is the vertical distance from the line of sight to the comb, Monte Carlo or heel of the stock. It is measured from an extension of a straight line drawn from the top of the front sight through the top surface of the open rear sight adjacent to the notch. The drops for target rifles are usually measured from the centerline of the bore.
3. Girth - The smallest circumferential dimension at the pistol grip.
4. Length of Pull - The distance from the center of the trigger to the center of the buttplate or recoil pad.
5. Length of Stock - The greatest dimension of the stock material.
6. Pitch - Not usually given for rifle.
B. Shotguns
1. Cast - Same as A.1., above.
2. Drop is the vertical distance from the line of sight to the comb, Monte Carlo or heel of the stock. It is measured from an extension of a straight line drawn from the base of the front bead sight across the highest point on the frame or receiver.
3. Girth - Same as A.3., above.
4. Length of Pull - same as A.4., above.
5. Length of Stock - Same as A.5., above.
6. Pitch is an expression used to indicate the relationship of the bore to the plane of the buttplate (pad). It is found by extending a line across the butt and drawing at right angles to this line an additional line through the highest point on the receiver or frame and measuring the distance from an extension of this line to a point at the base of the front sight bead. The pitch is said to be down if the described line is above the front sight and up if below. The pitch is normally down.

STOCK PITCH
The angle at which the buttplate or recoil pad slopes in relation to the bore axis. For method of measuring, see Stock Dimensions.

STOCK SCREW
A screw used for attaching the stock to the receiver or frame of a firearm. More than one may be used per firearm.

STOCK WARPAGE
The twisting and bending of a wood stock due to moisture absorption.

STOCK, BENCHREST
Generally, a large and heavy stock used exclusively for benchrest shooting.

STOCK, BLANK
A rough sawed piece of wood having the approximate external outline of a stock prior to final shaping.

STOCK, FREE RIFLE
A target rifle stock used for position shooting matches. The word “free” refers to the fact that there are no restrictions on its configuration or weight.

STOCK, HALF
A rifle stock with a fore-end which extends approximately to the midpoint of the barrel.

STOCK, LAMINATED
A stock which is made from two or more pieces of wood which have been glued together longitudinally.

STOCK, LENGTH OF
See Stock Dimensions.

STOCK, MANNLICHER
A full length rifle stock which extends from the butt to the muzzle.

STOCK, MONTE CARLO
A stock with a raised comb to bring the eye in alignment with the sight.

STOCK, OFFSET
A curved buttstock for use by a shooter who wishes to use the left eye when shooting right handed or vice versa. Also known as a Cross-Over Stock.

STOCK, ONE PIECE
A full length stock made from a single piece of wood. Includes both the butt and fore-end.

STOCK, PISTOL GRIP
A stock or buttstock having a downward extension behind the trigger guard somewhat resembling the grip of a pistol. Often found on target rifles.

STOCK, RIFLE
Refer to specific type, i.e. Stock, Mannlicher, etc.

STOCK, ROUGH INLETTED
See Stock, Semi-Inletted.

STOCK, SEMI-INLETTED
A firearm stock that has been machine inletted and requires additional hand fitting to achieve proper fit. Also called Rough Inletted.

STOCK, SEMIFINISHED
The term for a stock which has been rough shaped and partially or completely inletted.

STOCK, SHOTGUN
Any stock used on a shotgun. See Stock, Two Piece.

STOCK, SMALL OF THE
That portion of the stock between the rear of the action and the comb, which has the smallest circumference.

STOCK, STRAIGHT
1. A stock with no pistol grip
2. A stock with less than the normal amount of drop. (See “Stock Dimensions).

STOCK, TARGET
Any stock specifically made for firearms designed for target shooting.

STOCK, THREE-QUARTER
A rifle stock which has an abnormally long fore-end, but which does not reach the muzzle.

STOCK, THUMBHOLE
Any stock having a contoured hole in the grip area to accommodate the thumb of the trigger hand.

STOCK, TWO PIECE
A stock consisting of two separate parts, the buttstock and forearm.

STOCK, WHELAN
A rifle stock developed by Colonel Townsend Whelan which features a forward sloping comb and cheekpiece.

STOP, HAND
An attachment beneath the fore-end or forearm of a target rifle to restrict the forward movement of the hand. Often also used to attached a target sling.

STOPPAGE
This term is used when a firearm stops firing due to a malfunction of either the gun mechanism or ammunition. This term is normally used in connection with automatic firearms, machine guns, etc.

STOVE-PIPING
A failure to eject where the fired case is caught in the ejection port by the forward motion of the bolt The case protruding upward out of the ejection port is said to resemble an old fashioned stove pipe.

STRAIGHT PULL
A bolt action firearm in which the bolt need not be rotated to open or close the action but is reciprocated by a straight backward and forward motion of the shooter’s hand.

STRAIN GAGE
An electronic device to measure stress and strain in mechanical devices.

STRAIN SCREW
See Screw, Strain.

STRAP
1. See Sling.
2. See Strap, Back.
3. See Strap, Front.
4. See Top Strap.

STRAP, BACK
The exposed metal strip at the rear of a pistol or revolver grip.

STRAP, FRONT
The exposed metal strip at the front of a pistol or revolver grip.

STRAY
See Flyer.

STRIKER
A rod-like firing-pin or a separate component which impinges on the firing-pin and strikes the primer to fire a cartridge.

STRIKING ENERGY
See Energy, Terminal.

STRIKING VELOCITY
See Velocity, Terminal.

STRIP
To disassemble a firearm in order to clean, repair or transport it. “Field stripping” is simple disassembling for cleaning; “detail stripping” is a complete disassembly of the firearm into it’s components.

STRIPPED ACTION
See Action, Stripped.

STRIPPING
1. The act of disassembling a firearm.
2. The act of transferring cartridges from a loading (“stripper”) clip to the magazine.
3. Failure of a bullet to engage the rifling properly.

STRUT
See Hammer Strut.

STUD TRIGGER
See Trigger, Stud.

SUBCALIBER
An adaptation to a firearm to enable the firing of smaller or lower powered ammunition for which it was originally intended.

SUBCALIBER TUBE
A tube which is place in the bore of a firearm to enable the firing of smaller or lower powered ammunition.

SUIGI FINISH
A wood finish which is achieved by scorching to give a darkened and grainy appearance.

SWAGED CHOKE
See Choke, Swaged.

SWAGED RIFLING
See Rifling, Swaged.

SWIVEL BOW
That part of a swivel which is in the form of an elongated loop and to which a sling or carrying strap is passed through or otherwise attached.

SWIVEL, QUICK DETACHABLE
A two part sling swivel which has a stud that is attached to the stock or barrel and a bow portion which is mounted on a spring plunger arrangement. The plunger passes through a hole in the stud for attachment of the bow to the firearm. They are sometimes called Q.D. Swivels, and allow for quick mounting and dismounting of a sling from a firearm.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Abbreviations:

A-L | M-Z