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Chart of Unsafe Firearms and Ammunition Combinations

 


 

Glossary Results

R - 102 matching terms

RADIAL PRESSURE GAGE
See Gage, Radial Pressure.

RADIUS, MEAN
One method used to measure ammunition and/or firearm accuracy capability. To determine the mean radius, the center of the group is located, and the distance to the center of each shot from the group center is measured and recorded. The sum of these measurements divided by the number of shots is the mean radius.

RADIUS, NECK
The curved surface between the neck and the shoulder of a cartridge case.

RADIUS, SHOULDER
The curved surface between the body and the shoulder of a cartridge case.

RAMP SIGHT
See Sight, Ramp.

RAMP, FEED
See Cartridge Ramp.

RAMP, LOADING
A platform or cut placed in the bottom of the receiver that aids in guiding a cartridge into the chamber as the action is closed.

RAMP, SIGHT
A sight base having a sloping rear surface.

RAMROD
A rod used in seating a load in muzzle-loading firearms.

RANGE
1. An area equipped for testing firearms and ammunition.
2. The horizontal distance between the firearm and the target.

RANGE, EFFECTIVE
The maximum distance at which a projectile can be expected to be useful.

RANGE, MAXIMUM
The greatest distance a projectile can travel when fired at the optimum angle of elevation of the gun barrel.

RATCHET
A notched wheel on the rear of a revolver cylinder which causes the cylinder to rotate when so urged by a lever called a Hand or Pawl.

RATE OF TWIST
The distance required for the rifling to complete one revolution.

REAR SIGHT
See Sight, Rear.

REBARREL
The replacing of a barrel with another barrel.

REBATED HEAD
See Cartridge, Rebated.

REBOUND HAMMER
See Hammer, Rebound.

REBOUND SLIDE
See Slide, Rebound.

REBOUNDING LOCK
See Lock, Rebounding.

RECEIVER
The basic unit of a firearm which houses the firing and breech mechanism and to which the barrel and stock are assembled. In revolvers, pistols, and break-open guns, it is called the Frame.

RECEIVER BRIDGE
That part of the receiver on bolt action rifles that arches over the rear of the bolt hole. If cut to allow the passage of the bolt handle it is known as a Split Bridge.

RECEIVER RING
The front part of the receiver on bolt action rifles into which the barrel is fitted.

RECEIVER SIGHT
See Sight, Receiver.

RECEIVER, UNIVERSAL
A heavy duty mechanical device into which chambered barrels are secured for testing ammunition.

RECHAMBER
The cutting of a new chamber in a barrel to accommodate a cartridge of the same bore diameter.

RECOIL
The rearward movement of a firearm resulting from firing a cartridge or shotshell. Sometimes informally called “Kick”.

RECOIL ABSORBER
See Absorber, Recoil.

RECOIL LUG
See Lug, Recoil.

RECOIL OPERATED
An automatic or semiautomatic type firearm in which the force of recoil is used to unlock the breech bolt and then to complete the cycle of extracting, ejecting and reloading.

RECOIL PAD
A butt plate, usually of rubber, to reduce the sensible recoil of shoulder firearms.

RECOIL PENDULUM
A device for measuring Free Recoil Energy in which a firearm is suspended from fixed points so as to allow it to swing freely while the barrel remains horizontal.

RECOIL PLATE
1. Steel insert in the frame of a revolver immediately surrounding the firing-pin hole; also called Firing-Pin Bushing.
2. See Lug, Recoil.

RECOIL SHIELD
On a revolver, a lateral extension of the standing breech, to each side, to prevent fired or unfired cartridges from coming out of the chambers and to protect the otherwise exposed primers of unfired cartridges.

RECOIL SHOULDER
See Lug, Recoil.

RECOIL SPRING
The spring which returns a semiautomatic firearm to battery.

REDUCED CHARGE
See Charge, Reduced.

REFERENCE AMMUNITION
See Ammunition, Reference.

REGULATING BARRELS
The adjusting of the relationship of the axes of multi-barreled firearms so as to make the points of impact coincide.

RELIEF ENGRAVING
The carving of raised scenes that produces three-dimensional figures.

RELOADING
The process of manually reassembling a fired cartridge case with a new primer, propellant and bullet or wads and shot. Also called Handloading.

RELOADING COMPONENTS
Primers, propellant powder, bullets, or shot and wads, used with fired cases to load ammunition.

RELOADING DATA
A description of recommended relationships of reloading components.

RELOADING DIES
Tools which hold and/or reform cartridge cases or shotshells during a reloading operation.

RELOADING POWDERS
See Powders, Reloading.

REMAINING VELOCITY
See Velocity, Remaining.

REPEATER
Any firearm equipped with a magazine that holds more than one shot without reloading.

RESIDUAL PRESSURE
See Pressure, Residual.

RESIZING, FULL LENGTH
The operation of reforming a fired cartridge case to approximately its original dimensions.

REST
A device to support a firearm during firing.

REST, MANN “V”
A type of machine rest that was designed by Dr. Franklin W. Mann. Commonly called a V Block. A heavy Mann barrel suitably chambered for the cartridge to be tested in used with the rest.

REST, PALM
An adjustable support for a target rifle extending downward from the forearm.

RESTOCK
The replacement of one stock with another.

RETICLE
The aiming reference seen when looking through a telescopic sight.

RETRACTING SPRING
Alternate term for Operating Spring, Closing Spring, Recoil Spring.

RETRACTOR
Part used to move a breech bolt to rear.

REVOLVER
A firearm, usually a handgun, with a cylinder having several chambers so arranged as to rotate around an axis and be discharged successively by the same firing mechanism through a common barrel.

REVOLVER, DOUBLE ACTION
A type of revolver in which the rotation of the cylinder, cocking and firing are performed by a single pull of the trigger. Most Double Action revolvers can also be fired in the single action mode by manually cocking the hammer.

REVOLVER, SINGLE ACTION
A type of revolver in which the hammer must be cocked manually to rotate the cylinder for each shot. The firearm is then discharged by a pull of the trigger The process is repeated for each shot

RIB
A raised surface used as a sighting plane. Ribs may be either solid or ventilated. See Rib, Ventilated.

RIB EXTENSION
The protrusion of a rib beyond the breech end of a barrel.

RIB, SOLID
A solid raised surface above a barrel or barrels which functions as a sighting plane.

RIB, VENTILATED
A raised sighting surface which is separated from the barrel by means of posts that allow air to circulate around it. Its purpose is to minimize heat waves in the line of sight. Also called Bridge Rib.

RICOCHET
The glancing rebound of a projectile after impact.

RIFLE
A firearm having spiral grooves in the bore and designed to be fired from the shoulder.

RIFLE, AUTOMATIC
A fully automatic shoulder firearm that starts firing when the trigger is pulled and continues until the trigger is released or ammunition is exhausted. The term should not be used in conjunction with semiautomatic firearms.

RIFLE, BENCHREST
A rifle designed for optimum accuracy while being shot from the shoulder and supported by a specifically designed table (rest).

RIFLE, LONG
1. Originally, the term was used in reference to long-barreled flintlock rifles.
2. The name given one type of a caliber 22 rimfire cartridge.

RIFLE, VARMINT
A sporting rifle with a heavy barrel, designed for long range small game hunting, firing high velocity, flat trajectory projectiles.

RIFLED SLUG
See Slug, Rifled.

RIFLING
Grooves formed in the bore of firearm barrel to impart rotary motion to a projectile.

RIFLING BROACH
A tool having a series of cutting edges of slightly increasing height used to cut the spiral grooves in a rifle barrel.

RIFLING HEAD
That part of the hook or cut rifling tooling that holds the cutter and the mechanism for deepening the cut as the operation progresses.

RIFLING PITCH
The distance the projectile must move along a rifled bore to make one revolution. Usually expressed as “one turn in x inches (or millimeters).”

RIFLING, BUTTON
A process wherein a hardened steel disc or button with a rifling cross section configuration is pushed or pulled through a drilled and reamed barrel so as to cold form the rifling grooves to the desired depth and twist.

RIFLING, CUT
A process of forming the spiral grooves in the bore of a rifle barrel by a cutting tool which has a hook shape. Also called Hook Rifling.

RIFLING, HAMMERED
See Rifling, Swaged.

RIFLING, SWAGED
The formation of the spiral grooves in the bore of a rifle barrel by means of an internal mandrel and external hammers. Sometimes called “Hammer Foreged Rifling”.

RIM
The flanged portion of the head of a rimfire cartridge, certain types of centerfire rifle and revolver cartridges and shotshells. The flanged portion is usually larger in diameter than the cartridge or shotshell body diameter and provides a projecting lip for the firearm extractor to engage so that the cartridge or shotshell may be extracted from the chamber after firing. In a rimfire cartridge the rim provides a cavity into which the priming mixture is charged.

RIM SEAT
A counterbore in the rear end of a chamber or bolt face to support the head of a rimmed cartridge.

RIM, CRACKED
A radial rupture of the head and rim of a rimfire cartridge or shotshell.

RIM, SPLIT (RIM-SPLIT)
A circumferential rupture of the rim of a rimfire cartridge or shotshell.

RIMFIRE CARTRIDGE
See Cartridge, Rimfire.

RIMLESS CASE
See Cartridge, Rimless.

RIMMED CASE
See Cartridge, Rimmed.

RING BULGE
See Barrel, Ringed.

RINGED BARREL
See Barrel, Ringed.

RIOT GUN
See Gun, Riot.

RIVELLING
A British term for the wrinkled appearance of some shotgun bores.

ROD EJECTOR
See Ejector, Rod.

ROLLED CRIMP
See Crimp, Rolled.

ROLLING BLOCK
See Action, Rolling Block.

ROTARY MAGAZINE
See Magazine, Rotary.

ROTATION, PROJECTILE
See Projectile Rotation.

ROUND
One complete small arms cartridge.

ROUND BALL PROJECTILE
See Projectile, Round Ball.

ROUND BUTT
See Butt, Round.

ROUND NOSE BULLET
See Bullet, Round Nose.

RUNAWAY (GUN)
A malfunctioning automatic firearm that fires multiple shots after trigger pressure is released..

RUNOVER CHECKERING
See Checkering, Runover.

RUNOVERS
Checkering or engraving lines that go beyond the border.

RUPTURE
A generally circumferential separation in the side wall of a cartridge case. May be complete or partial.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Abbreviations:

A-L | M-Z